Learning from our mistakes

― Posted by Frenk T. Sedmak Nahtigal on Mar 6th, 2013 ―

photo credit: Bruce Caron via CSS

Often in life we follow patterns, repetitions of our actions as we are engaged in a single-learning loop. We see things as they appear and rush to get to the results of our actions focusing only on incremental changes. If our actions do not yield expected results, we might fine-tune our strategy or change it in hope of achieving them. But sometimes that is not enough to achieve the desired results. We need to change the way we think, question our values, our beliefs. Thinking about what we are doing and reflecting upon our actions, questioning what was it we were doing and we will engage in the double learning loop. First introduced by Chrys Argyris and Donald Schön in 1974 (Theory in Practice).

An example to distinguish the given models, also from the book Theory in Practice, is the usage of a thermostat. In a single learning loop, thermostat turns on (or off) when the ambient temperature drops below (or is raised above) the pre-set temperature, whilst in the double-learning loop the thermostat would question the set temperature based on how many people are in the room, their age, size of the room etc.

We can try to apply these two models to our decision-making process. Often we find it hard to recognize the fundamental errors in the decision model we have created or the decisions that we have made. But looking at someone else’s decision model we are most likely to find such mistakes in the decision model. This is because the perspective is changed when the decision model is viewed from another (unbiased) point of view. We can do a lot by just putting our emotions aside and/or change perspective.

This is why we introduced the social component into odesys. Sharing your decision model with your friends or followers just might bring you the edge of a double-learning loop if you happen to get stuck in a single-learning loop.

If you can get to a state where you reflect upon your actions and yourself, you can fundamentally change who you are and thus your decision-making as such.

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • LinkedIn
  • Digg Often in life we follow patterns, repetitions of our actions as we are engaged in a single-learning loop. We see things as they appear and rush to get to the results of our actions
  • Reddit
Google+